Selected Recent Media:


Dateline:

Baltimore, MD

(Category: Media)

Interview Excerpt:

 

HOST MARY MCKENZIE: It may be the furthest thing from your mind during these hot summer days – Christmas. There’s Santa right there. Coming up, we’ll tell you why you should start planning for the big day now. HOST: I can’t believe I’m about to utter these words. The Fourth of July now over, so it’s time to start planning for Christmas. No, seriously. Kyle Winkfield is here – he’s the President of the Winkfield Group – to tell us why starting early making a plan is so important. So, Kyle, good morning, first of all. Thanks for being here. I think a lot of folks may have groaned when we said that, but it is smart to plan ahead, to think about Christmas coming up and maybe a budget, perhaps, so that it doesn’t – I always say it sneaks up on us every year, like we don’t know it’s coming.

 

KYLE WINKFIELD, PRESIDENT OF THE WINKFIELD GROUP: Well, thanks for having me

 

HOST: A pleasure.

 

WINKFIELD: Did you know, Mary, the average American shopper spent between $700 and $1,000 last Christmas season on Christmas gifts and they put it on the credit card.

 

The entire interview is on YouTube.



Dateline:

Rockville, MD

(Category: Media)

Selected Quote:

 

“Some debt might be unavoidable. Most of us will need to take on mortgage debt if we want to buy a home, for instance. But other forms of debt, such as credit card debt, are more dangerous because of the high interest associated with it. Younger consumers can learn a lot about the positives of avoiding debt by following the examples of their grandparents,” Winkfield said.

 

Complete Article at ClarkHoward.com

 



Dateline:

Rockville, MD

(Category: Media)

Selected quotes:

“The Great Depression had a huge impact on those who lived through it. Those who remember those tough days tend to place more value on saving money than they do on risking it,” said Kyle Winkfield, founder of The Winkfield Group, a retirement-planning firm in Rockville, Maryland. ”

 

“They understand that living within their means is not a sign of failure. Instead, they recognize it as a virtue. And younger consumers should do the same, Winkfield says.”

 

“[Older clients] are very focused on reality,” Winkfield says. “They want me to tell it to them straight. And if that means telling them that something

 

Complete Article at MoneyRates.com



Dateline:

Frederick, MD

(Category: Media)

Excerpt:

 

From recent graduates receiving initial loan statements to mid-career professionals still paying for degrees, the question of paying student loans or saving for retirement affects many. Without a doubt, student debt hits medical graduates hard – to the tune of $166,750 on average. Before long, the shock of decades-long loan payments sets in, and suddenly, saving for retirement seems more fantasy than reality. You want to pay the loans and prepare for the future. But we all have limited wealth. Should yours go towards debt obligations or the future you?

 

Complete Article: Healthcare Business Today



Dateline:

New York, NY

(Category: Media)

NEW YORK (TheStreet) — Over the past three years, financial planner Kyle Winkfield has seen a 50% increase in the number of clients approaching retirement who want a formal withdrawal plan for their retirement money.

“The conversation typically starts with them wanting to know if they will be OK in retirement and have enough money to keep them in the lifestyle they want,” said Winkfield who is president of The Winkfield Group in Rockville, Md.

 

Winkfield’s observation is no surprise given that 63% of newly retired 66-year-olds have no plan for how much to withdraw from their IRAs or 401(k) plans, according to new research from T.Rowe Price.